Call for Papers: Monsters and Monstrosity A Special Issue of The Popular Culture Studies Journal

Thanks to Norma Jones for supporting special issue. Please consider submitting and share widely.

Call for Papers: Monsters and Monstrosity
A Special Issue of The Popular Culture Studies Journal
Guest Editor: Bernadette Marie Calafell, University of Denver

Scholars, such as W. Scott Poole and Kendall Phillips, have argued that monsters, particularly those in horror, reflect or correspond to the cultural anxieties of a society. These cultural anxieties are often connected to struggles for power around race, class, gender, sexuality, and ability. Thus, historical context and power are central to studies of monstrosity. Given that we are immersed in what may be considered a horror renaissance, both in film and television, increasing violence against people of color in the U.S., and dangerous and toxic performances of white femininity and masculinity, this is a ripe moment to explore the relationship between monstrosity and popular culture, both literally and figuratively. Thus, this special issues solicits manuscripts that take interdisciplinary approaches to explore the theoretical and methodological possibilities of monstrosity. What can employing monstrosity as a theoretical framework or analytical tool contribute to the study of popular culture? Key questions driving this special issue include: What can monstrosity teach us about Otherness? How can it be used resistively? Conversely, how can monstrosity be used as a tool of oppression? In what ways we can be unpack figures, such as Donald Trump, through the lens of monstrosity? What constitutes monstrosity? How might we understand history differently through the construct of monstrosity? What are the necessary future directions for the study of monstrosity and popular culture? Critical rhetorical, critical qualitative (including critical auto-methodologies), and performative approaches to monstrosity are welcomed.

Potential areas of interest include, but are not limited to:

Twin Peaks and monstrosity
Monstrosity and comics
David Lynch’s uses of monstrosity
NBC’s Hannibal
Adult Swim
Monstrous remakes
History and monstrosity
Afrofuturism and monstrosity
Monstrosity and agency
Monstrous bodies
Monstrous consumption
Monstrosity and adolescence
Monstrosity, menstruation, or menopause
Fatness and monstrosity
Excess and monstrosity
Chicanxfuturism and monstrosity
Celebrity culture and monstrosity
Performance and monstrosity
Wrestling and monstrosity
Intersectional approaches to monstrosity
Feminist possibilities of monstrosity
American Horror Story
Queerness and monstrosity
Monstrosity and sports
Disability and monstrosity
Class and monstrosity
Game of Thrones
Monstrous politicians and politics
The 2016 U.S. Presidential election
Autobiography and monstrosity
Monstrous methodologies
Hybridity and monstrosity
White femininity and monstrosity
Monstrosity and military culture
Monstrosity and toxic masculinities
Monstrosity and white masculinity
Monstrosity and religion
Monstrosity and temporality
Chicana feminism and monstrosity
Monstrosity and Orientalism

Questions can be directed to Bernadette Calafell at Bernadette.Calafell@du.edu. Please electronically send submissions (three documents, MS WORD, MLA) to Bernadette Calafell via email at Bernadette.Calafell@du.edu by December 1, 2017.

1) Title Page: A single title page must accompany the email, containing complete contact information (address, phone number, e-mail address).
2) Manuscript: On the first page of the manuscript, only include the article’s title, being sure not to include the author’s name. The journal employs a “blind review” process, meaning that a copy of the article will be sent to reviewers without revealing the author’s name. Please include the works cited with your manuscript.
3) Short Bio: On a separate document, please also include a short (100 words) bio. We will include this upon acceptance and publication.

Essays should range between 15-25 pages of double-spaced text in 12 pt. Times New Roman font, including all images, endnotes, and Works Cited pages. Please note that the 15-page minimum should be 15 pages of written article material. Less than 15 pages of written material will be rejected and the author asked to develop the article further. Essays should also be written in clear US English in the active voice and third person, in a style accessible to the broadest possible audience. Authors should be sensitive to the social implications of language and choose wording free of discriminatory overtones.

For documentation, The Popular Culture Studies Journal follows the Modern Language Association style, as articulated by Joseph Gibaldi and Walter S. Achtert in the paperback MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers (New York: MLA), and in The MLA Style Manual (New York: MLA). The most current editions of both guides will be the requested editions for use. This style calls for a Works Cited list, with parenthetical author/page references in the text. This approach reduces the number of notes, which provide further references or explanation.

For punctuation, capitalization, hyphenation, and other matters of style, follow the MLA Handbook and the MLA Style Manual, supplemented as necessary by The Chicago Manual of Style (Chicago: University of Chicago Press). The most current edition of the guide will be the requested edition for use.

It is essential for authors to check, correct, and bring manuscripts up to date before final submission. Authors should verify facts, names of people, places, and dates, and double-check all direct quotations and entries in the Works Cited list. Manuscripts not in MLA style will be returned without review.

We are happy to receive digital artwork. Please save line artwork (vector graphics) as Encapsulated PostScript (EPS) and bitmap files (halftones or photographic images) as Tagged Image Format (TIFF), with a resolution of at least 300 dpi at final size. Do not send native file formats. Please contact the editor for discussion of including artwork.

Upon acceptance of a manuscript, authors are required to sign a form transferring the copyright from the author to the publisher. A copy will be sent to authors at the time of acceptance.

Before final submission, the author will be responsible for obtaining letters of permission for illustrations and for quotations that go beyond “fair use,” as defined by current copyright law.

NCA Preconference Call

NCA Preconference Call

Our (Monstrous) Legacies, Our (Cultural) Relevancies: Exploring the Significance of Monstrosity, Horror, and Otherness for Communication Studies

Organizers: Bernadette Marie Calafell, University of Denver and Kendall Phillips, Syracuse University

Lead Scholars
Bernadette Marie Calafell, University of Denver
Benny LeMaster, California State University, Long Beach
Marina Levina, University of Memphis
Casey Ryan Kelly, University of Nebraska
Kendall Phillips, Syracuse University
Claire Sisco King, Vanderbilt University

Recent years have seen the steady growth of scholarship in Communication Studies centered on unpacking the cultural relevance and persuasive strategies of horror films and television shows (Phillips, 2005, 2012; Sisco King, 2007; 2010; Levina & Diem-my, 2013; LeMaster, 2011; Means Coleman, 2011; Greene & Meyer, 2014, Lacy, 2015; Cady & Oates, 2016; Kelly, 2016, 2017; Abdi & Calafell, 2017). Simultaneously, another body of scholarship that focuses on monstrosity as a key term has also emerged as a frame for understanding social anxieties around Otherness (Moreman & Calafell, 2008; Juarez, 2014; Al-Ghabra, 2015; Calafell, 2012, 2015; Levina & Diem-my Bui, 2013; Holman Jones & Harris, 2016). This scholarship has contributed to and extended the interdisciplinary study of monsters by scholars, such as Cohen (1996), Gelder (2000), Creed (2002); Williams (2002), Clover (2002), Carroll (2002), Tudor (2002), Wood (2002), Ramirez-Berg (2012), Poole (2011), and Benshoff (1997; 2017).

Taking a historical perspective, Poole (2011) argues that monsters emerge in relationship to key historical events or moments. For example, giant creatures of the 1950s and 1960s, such as Godzilla or Mothra correlated with rising cultural anxieties surrounding the atomic bomb. Furthermore, Phillips (2005) unpacks the rhetorical significance of horror films in the twentieth century to consider how they reflect controversies of the historical moment. He argues Dracula reflected concerns and struggles over sexual norms, immigrants, religion, science, and economic conditions. In a later project, Phillips (2012) critically examines, through an auteur perspective, the work of directors Wes Craven, John Carpenter, and George Romero to unpack central themes around race, consumption, security, and class in films of each director as they relate to different cultural moments.
Other scholars, like Clover (2002), Creed (2002), Sisco King (2007), Calafell (2015), Kelly (2016), and Al-Ghabra (2015), further intercede in this dialogue to unpack the role of gender in horror films and television shows. Traditionally, women have been the victims of violence in horror. Williams (2002) pushes scholars to the consider the relationship of the female spectator to horror. Briefel (2005) argues that male monsters are connected to masochism, while female monsters are linked to menstruation, which causes audience members to feel “an uncomfortable close relationship to the female monster” (p. 16). Clover (2002) developed the term final girl to describe the female who survives the horror film and defeats the monster. She exhibits masculine traits and is often asexual. These characteristics allow her to survive, while more stereotypically feminine or sexual women are killed by the monster, often in violent and gory fashions. More recently, Calafell (2015) charts the move toward a critique of post-feminism in the films American Mary and The Lords of Salem against rising turns to nostalgia for the gender and racial norms of the 1950s and 1960s.

Just as horror has centered a masculine persona, it has also privileged narratives that support whiteness both ideologically, and in terms of racialized bodies. This has occurred through consistently white hero figures, killing off characters of color early on, and showcasing monsters that reflect themes of Otherness. Against these traditions, Means Coleman (2011) offers a history of horror through the lens of Blackness, charting representations of Black characters and monsters in horror films. Similarly, Lacy (2015) considers the Frankenstein’s monster narrative through Blackness. Benshoff (1997) and Sisco King (2010) examine the relationship between sexuality and monstrosity in horror films, while Holman Jones and Harris (2016) explore the queer potential of the monstrous. Offering a perspective of the monstrous feminine that moves away from Creed (2002) and the dominant tradition of psychoanalysis, Abdi and Calafell (2017) critically examine the Iranian Spaghetti Western, A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night, made by Iranian American director Ana Lily Amirpour to demonstrate how the film employs the frames of monstrous feminists and queer utopias to imagine possibilities for transnational feminist agency.

Monster theory, which is closely related to horror, utilizes monstrosity as a frame to theorize Otherness. Cohen (1996) offers seven theories of monster culture, including that the monster’s body is a “cultural space,” the monster brings category crisis, the monster dwells within difference, and the fear of the monster is connected to desire. This work has been influential in recent work, including Calafell (2015), which uses the trope to examine both horror texts, as well as performances of monstrosity in everyday life through studies of women of color in the academy, Kanye West, and the Aurora shooter James Holmes. This work demonstrates how monstrosity can be a space of agency and resistance for historically marginalized communities, and can be used as a trope to name destructive and violent forms of whiteness. For example, Dubrofsky (2016) draws upon Calafell’s (2015) work to consider the role of the monstrosity of whiteness in performances and rhetoric by then presidential candidate Donald Trump.

Given the contributions of scholarship on horror and monstrosity historically, its importance at this cultural moment, as well as the shift in popular culture toward monsters (i.e. Lady Gaga’s The Fame Monster, Kanye West’s uses of monstrosity, American Horror Story, The Walking Dead, Get Out, Black Mirror), it is a ripe time for us as Communication scholars to consider our legacy and our relevance in relationship to horror and monstrosity. As Communication scholars, we should ask: What unique contributions or theoretical frames can we offer to the study of horror and monstrosity? How do we constitute text in our study of horror and monstrosity? What unique methodologies might we employ to critically examine monstrosity (i.e. performative writing, autoethnograpy, archival research, intersectional critique)?

This day long preconference is organized around the following questions:

• What unique contributions or theoretical frames can we, as Communication scholars, offer to the study of horror and monstrosity?

• How do we constitute text in our study of horror and monstrosity? What unique methodologies might we employ to critically examine monstrosity (i.e. performative writing, autoethnograpy, archival research, intersectional critique)?

• What are the meanings around Otherness that emerged in representations of monstrosity in this contemporary political and cultural moment?

• How can we re-examine and re-visit historical moments through the lens of monstrosity to consider new ways of understanding? What new readings might be explored in the history of horror films?

• What are important future developments or directions that are emerging in the study of horror and monstrosity?

We would solicit short proposals (2-3 pages) from scholars interested in participating that speak to one of the questions listed above by August 15th, 2017. These proposals should be sent to Bernadette Calafell at Bernadette.Calafell@du.edu. We will organize the preconference thematically around these questions, allowing for scholars to present their work and receive feedback from other participants and the seminar leaders. Potential participants should indicate which question or theme they are interested in exploring. Rather than inviting lead scholars to present their scholarship while participants who sign up for the preconference serve as observers and questioners, as is often the tradition, we democratically would like to create an opportunity for both scholars new to the field, as well as those already immersed, to workshop their ideas. Ideally, participants would send a short paper (approximately 8-10 pages) to the seminar leaders before the convention. We encourage involvement from graduate students as well as scholars who would like to participate, but not present research.

It is our hope that this preconference will go beyond the conference through syllabus sharing, as well as the potential for collaboration through publication, such as an edited volume or special issue in a journal.

CFP: Voices in Middle Eastern and North African Communication and Cultural Studies: Thinking Transnationally

Call for Papers: Proposed Book Project

Voices in Middle Eastern and North African Communication and Cultural Studies: Thinking Transnationally  

Editors: Dr. Haneen S. Ghabra, Kuwait University, Dr. Fatima Zahrae Chrifi Alaoui, San Francisco State University, Dr. Shadee Abdi, University of New Mexico, and Dr. Bernadette Marie Calafell, University of Denver

At the heart of communication and critical cultural studies is a discipline that has been slowly expanding its borders around the issues of racism, sexism, ability, privilege, and oppression. As Latinx, African American, Asian Pacific American, Disability and LGBTQ studies widen and shift the scope of Communication Studies, what often gets underplayed is the role of transnational Middle Eastern and North African (MENA) studies. It is imperative that the experiences of transnational individuals who live and move between the region and the U.S. are centered. For this reason, our goal is to begin to bring Middle Eastern communication and critical cultural studies in conversation with global and transnational studies. We ask, how can scholars make a space for transnational MENA studies within communication and cultural studies? What are the pressing issues? Thus, at a time where Arab, Arab Americans, Iranians, and Iranian Americans, and other MENA ethnic communities are under attack by Western media and governments, it is crucial to center their voice from a transnational perspective that privileges their positionalities and experiences rather than continue to study them from a reductive Eurocentric lens. Accordingly, this book aims to bring together a diverse collection of essays to showcase the complexity and cultural nuances that compose the Middle East and North Africa and its diasporas in the United States. Important work has been published interdisciplinary by prominent scholars such as Lila Abu-Lughod, Janet Afary; Leila Ahmed; Nadje Al-Ali; Amar; Talal Asad; miriam cooke; Deniz Kandiyoti; Saba Mahmood; Joseph Massad; Fatema Mernissi; Afsaneh Najmabadi; Edward Said; Jack Shaheen; Nadera Shalhoub-Kevorkian, Sima Shakhsari; Loubna Skalli. We seek to build on existing scholarship by including essays that theorize from a communication and critical cultural studies lenses. Our approach to communication and critical cultural studies is informed by critical performative, rhetorical, feminist, queer, intercultural, social justice and media studies. Furthermore, scholars are encouraged to focus on specific countries or diasporas or general representations of the MENA region. This book aims to bring together work by established and new or emerging scholars.

List of suggested topics for submission can include (but are not limited to):

  • Creative or performative approaches or perspectives to MENA identities
  • Vernacular discourse
  • Critical Rhetoric of Muslims in Western Discourse
  • Postcolonial approaches to MENA identities
  • Intersectionality
  • Queer/ed approaches to MENA identities

.  Social movements and social justice

.  Social media and youth

.  MENA feminisms

.  Critical intercultural approaches to MENA

.  Monstrosity and horror

Submission Requirements and Due Dates

In order to have a creative work and/or research manuscript considered for publication, please submit the following:

  1. A 1- to 2 page chapter proposal summarizes your submission’s goals, scope, and argument with a clear articulation of your submission’s contribution to MENA, communication, and critical cultural studies.
  2. A copy of each author’s most recent CV.

Please email these materials to Drs. Haneen Ghabra, Fatima Zahrae Chrifi Alaoui, Shadee Abdi, and Bernadette Marie Calafell at menacommunication@gmail.com by September 15th, 2017.

Responses to submitters will be sent by December 18th, 2017, with first drafts due by June 1st, 2018. 

Questions should be directed to menacommunication@gmail.com 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WSCA Performance Studies Interest Group CFP 2018 Conference

Performance Studies Interest Group

2018 WSCA Convention

February 15 – February 19, 2018

Santa Clara, CA

“Mindfulness and Communication”

 

Call for Papers, Performances, and Programs

Submission deadline: September 1, 2017

 

Refusal to take a moral stand is itself a powerful statement of one’s moral position.

-Dwight Conquergood, “Performing as a Moral Act: Ethical Dimensions of the Ethnography of Performance”

 

This is my culture, my entertainment, nothing to laugh over, this is me.

            –Michele Serros, Chicana Falsa: And Other Stories of Death, Identity, and Oxnard

 

The impetus to speak must be carefully analyzed and, in many cases (certainly for academics!), fought against. This may seem an odd way to begin discussing how to speak for, but the point is that the impetus to always be the speaker and to speak in all situations must be seen for what it is: a desire for mastery and domination. If one’s immediate impulse is to teach rather than listen to a less-privileged speaker, one should resist that impulse long enough to interrogate it carefully. Some of us have been taught that by right of having the dominant gender, class, race, letters after our name, or some other criterion we are more likely to have the truth. Others have been taught the opposite, and will speak haltingly, with apologies, if they speak at all…We must also interrogate the bearing of our location and context on what it is we are saying, and this should be an explicit part of every serious discursive practice we engage in…Speaking should always carry with it an accountability and responsibility for what one says.

            -Linda Martín Alcoff, “The Problem of Speaking for Others”

 

The Performance Studies Interest Group invites submissions for WSCA’s 2018 annual convention. This year’s theme is “Mindfulness and Communication,” which invites us as an interest group to reflect on the relationship between ethics, performance, and power. The theme further implicates us to be (intersectionally) reflexive and critical about our identities and relationships to performance and what we study. Mindfulness asks us to consider what is at stake in acts of performance. Additionally, the conference theme also encourages us to be mindful of the different iterations of performance, which mirror Dwight Conquergood’s argument that “the performance studies project makes its most radical intervention, I believe by embracing both written scholarship and creative work, papers and performances. We challenge the hegemony of the text best by reconfiguring texts and performances in horizontal, metonymic tension, not by replacing one hierarchy with another, the romance of performance for the authority of the text” (151). Thus, the interest group welcomes submissions that understand performance as a way of knowing through embodiment both on the page and the stage.

In the spirit of the conference theme, the division invites submissions that explore the relationship between mindfulness and performance. For example, how might mindfulness inform our understanding of Conquergood’s dialogic performative or co-performative witnessing? Where does mindfulness meet ethical questions surrounding performance, particularly in fieldwork or performance ethnography? Is mindfulness important as we enact critical or intersectional reflexivity and speaking for the Other? What is the role of ethics, mindfulness, and fiction in performance studies? What is the relationship between the audience and mindfulness? How might we as performance scholars problematize popular discourses of mindfulness? How might the lens of performance lead us to consider issues of cultural appropriation and mindfulness? In what ways might calls for mindfulness mirror oppressive calls for civility that silence critiques from the margins? Who is implicated and who is silenced in popular iterations of mindfulness? How do these iterations intersect with race, class, gender, sexuality, nationalism, citizenship, and ability? What does mindfulness’ call for “the practice of present moment awareness while remaining non-judgmental about self and others” mean in the age of a Trump presidency? What is the relationship between the role of the performer/critic and mindfulness?

Programs and/panels co-sponsored with other interest groups are encouraged as they increase opportunities for intradisciplinary dialogue and may also allow for more submissions recommended for acceptance to be paneled. Mark the top left of submission with name of the potential CO-SPONSOR INTEREST GROUP.

 

  1. COMPETITIVE PAPERS
    1. Scholar-artists are encouraged to submit papers to the Performance Studies Interest Group for competitive selection. Papers should have a performance studies research focus and can utilize any methodology, critique, and/or theoretical perspective. We welcome diverse and creative approaches to academic research (e.g., critical/cultural, indigenous, queer, feminist, poetic, personal narrative, autoethnography, performance ethnography, among others). Competitive Papers should not: (1) have been presented at another conference or convention; (2) have been published; and (3) have been accepted for publication. All submissions should use APA, MLA, or Chicago style.
    2. Debut Award: The Performance Studies Interest Group welcomes and encourages debut competitive papers. The WSCA Executives Club Award is made to the author or co-authors of a paper presented as the convention “who have not presented a paper at a state, regional, national, or international convention, or published in any academic journal.” Papers presented at student-only conferences are exempt from this requirement. All authors of a co-authored paper must meet these eligibility requirements for a paper to be considered a Debut Paper. Papers eligible for the Debut Award should be marked “DEBUT” in the upper right-hand corner of the title page. Indicate whether each author is a bachelor’s, master’s, or doctoral student.
    3. All papers should be submitted in PDF, RTF, or MS Word format. Submitted papers should include two separate attachments:
      1. A title page with title of paper, names of all authors, and the addresses, phone numbers, email addresses, and institutional affiliations of each author. Also include audio-visual requests only if absolutely necessary for your presentation or performance. You are encouraged to bring your own audio-visual equipment(s) whenever possible. Equipment availability is extremely limited and expensive. See the WSCA policy on Audio-Visual Equipment at Conventions in the Policies and Procedures Manual on the website http://www.westcomm.org/
      2. The paper, including a 100-250 word abstract, and a maximum of 25 pages of text. Remove authors’ names from the paper.
    4. Please submit competitive and debut papers electronically to:

Bernadette Marie Calafell

Program Planner, Performance Studies Interest Group

Bernadette.Calafell@du.edu

  1. PANEL PERFORMANCES
    1. We invite scholar-artists to submit completed scripts for performances to be scheduled on panels. Panel performances should be between 10-15 minutes and can be in various modes (e.g., critical/cultural, indigenous, queer, feminist, poetic, personal narrative, performance (auto)ethnography, multimedia, digital, etc.). While you are invited to submit program panels featuring a number of short performances (see program proposals below), panel performances are intended for individuals (or groups) with 10-15 minute performances interested in being programmed with other 10-15 minute panel performances. To submit a performance for consideration, submit the following separate attachments:
      1. A title page with title of performance, names of all performers, and the addresses, phone numbers, e-mail addresses, and institutional affiliations for each performer. Also include audio-visual requests only if absolutely necessary for your performance. You are encouraged to bring your own audio-visual equipment(s) whenever possible. Equipment availability is extremely limited and expensive. See the WSCA policy on Audio-Visual Equipment at Conventions in the Policies and Procedures Manual on the web site http://www.westcomm.org
      2. The completed script. Please remove author and performer names from the script.
    2. Please submit panel performances electronically to:

Bernadette Marie Calafell

Program Planner, Performance Studies Interest Group

Bernadette.Calafell@du.edu

 

  • SOLO/ENSEMBLE PERFORMANCES
    1. We invite scholar-artists to submit completed scripts and for solo and/or ensemble performances. Solo/ensemble performances are intended to fill an entire panel slot (75 minutes, preferably including time for discussion and/or questions) and can assume various modes (e.g., critical/cultural, indigenous, queer, feminist, poetic, personal narrative, performance (auto)ethnography, multimedia, digital, etc.). To submit a solo/ensemble performance for consideration, submit the following separate attachments:
      1. A title page with title of solo or ensemble performance, names of all performers, and the addresses, phone numbers, e-mail addresses, and institutional affiliations for each performer. Also include audio-visual requests only if absolutely necessary for your performance. You are encouraged to bring your own audio-visual equipment(s) whenever possible. Equipment availability is extremely limited and expensive. See the WSCA policy on Audio-Visual Equipment at Conventions in the Policies and Procedures Manual on the web site http://www.westcomm.org
      2. The completed script. Please remove author and performer names from the script.
    2. Please submit solo/ensemble performances electronically to:

Bernadette Marie Calafell

Program Planner, Performance Studies Interest Group

Bernadette.Calafell@du.edu

 

  1. PROGRAM PROPOSALS
    1. Program proposals should focus on a unifying theme relevant to research, theory, or instruction in Performance Studies. Programs may consist of a chair, individual presenters/performers, and a critic or respondent in a format traditionally presented at conferences. However, ensemble or solo performances, debates, round table discussions, performance activities, or other unique formats are encouraged. Innovative program proposals, especially those that provide opportunities for interaction among participants and attendees, are encouraged.
    2. All program proposals should be submitted in PDF, RTF, or MS Word format. Submitted program proposals should include two separate attachments:
      1. A title page with title of program, names of all participants (include specific titles for individuals, if inclined), and the addresses, phone numbers, email addresses, and institutional affiliations of each participant. Also include audio-visual requests only if absolutely necessary for your performance. You are encouraged to bring your own audio-visual equipment(s) whenever possible. Equipment availability is extremely limited and expensive. See the WSCA policy on Audio-Visual Equipment at Conventions in the Policies and Procedures Manual on the website http://www.westcomm.org/
      2. The proposal, including descriptions of performances, abstracts, or scripts, etc. fitting the format of the proposed program. Remove author names, please.
    3. Please submit program proposals electronically to:

Bernadette Marie Calafell

Program Planner, Performance Studies Interest Group

Bernadette.Calafell@du.edu

 

  1. Western States Communication Association Performance Studies Interest Group Outstanding Contributions to Performance Studies Award (OCPSA)
    1. This award seeks to honor a WSCA member who has completed a terminal degree and has been active with performance studies for more than five years. The criteria for this award are as follows:
      1. Regular past or present attendance to the WSCA convention and active involvement in the performance studies discipline as well as the performance studies interest group
      2. A robust body of scholarship including both publications and performances
  • A history of service to performance studies with specific service to WSCA.
  1. Persons must be nominated (including self-nominations) by a current WSCA member
  2. Winner should ideally plan to attend the convention in which she/he/ze is being awarded
  1. Deadline: Nominations are due by the WSCA submission deadline. Letters of nomination should be no more than 2 pages and include the following: a brief history of the individual’s work, a justification for awarding the individual, and a description of the contributions made by this individual to WSCA. Please also include a copy of the nominee’s CV. All nominations must be sent via email to the Chair-Elect of the Performance Studies Interest group, Amira De La Garza, who serves as the OCPSA Committee Chairperson.
  2. Submit nominations electronically to:

mindfulheretic@gmail.com and place “OCPSA Nomination” in the subject line.

Should you have questions, do not hesitate to contact the Performance Studies Interest Group chair at: Bernadette.Calafell@du.edu

WSCA award

Please consider nominating someone for this award!

Western States Communication Association Performance Studies Interest Group Outstanding Contributions to Performance Studies Award (OCPSA)
a. This award seeks to honor a WSCA member who has completed a terminal degree and has been active with performance studies for more than five years. The criteria for this award are as follows:
i. Regular past or present attendance to the WSCA convention and active involvement in the performance studies discipline as well as the performance studies interest group
ii. A robust body of scholarship including both publications and performances
iii. A history of service to performance studies with specific service to WSCA.
iv. Persons must be nominated (including self-nominations) by a current WSCA member
v. Winner should ideally plan to attend the convention in which she/he/ze is being awarded

b. Deadline: Nominations are due by the WSCA submission deadline, September 1, 2016. Letters of nomination should be no more than 2 pages and include the following: a brief history of the individual’s work, a justification for awarding the individual, and a description of the contributions made by this individual to WSCA. Please also include a copy of the nominee’s CV. All nominations must be sent via email to the Chair-Elect of the Performance Studies Interest group, Bernadette Calafell, who serves as the OCPSA Committee Chairperson.
c. Submit nominations electronically to:
Bernadette.Calafell@du.edu and place “OCPSA Nomination” in the subject line.

Should you have questions, do not hesitate to contact the Performance Studies Interest Group chair at WesternPSIG@gmail.com or Chair-Elect at Bernadette.Calafell@du.edu.